Virtue signaling run amok

  1. Virtue signaling run amok
  2. Not the intelligence assessment he asked for
  3. Political Shingles
  4. Best rhetorical question of the week?

1

This item from The Stanford [University] Daily newspaper puts a nice gloss on the stupefying idiocy in the campus sex-and-identity debate. Single-occupancy Restrooms Convert to All-gender Facilities: “Single-occupancy restrooms on campus will soon all be converted to gender-neutral facilities due to new California legislature and ongoing administrative efforts. The Diversity and Access Office (D&A Office) has been spearheading the campaign to convert all single-occupancy restrooms….”

Here’s what I don’t get: if a single-occupancy restroom is going to be used by one person at a time, what need is there to officially designate the sex of any person using it? And why are officials at an elite university wasting their time on this?

(James Howard Kunstler)

2

The Wall Street Journal seems to be particularly adept at ferreting out conflicts between the President and intelligence officials, breaking this story Friday evening (New York Times and Washington Post don’t cover it, at least prominently):

An intelligence report by the Department of Homeland Security contradicts the White House’s assertion that immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries pose a particular risk of being terrorists and should be blocked from entering the U.S.

The report is the latest volley in a struggle between intelligence officials and the Trump administration that has rippled across several agencies. Some officials have critiqued administration policies, while the president and senior members of his staff have accused officials of leaking information to undermine his administration and the legitimacy of his election.

The report, reviewed by The Wall Street Journal, came from Homeland Security’s Office of Intelligence and Analysis. It said that its staff “assesses that country of citizenship is unlikely to be a reliable indicator of potential terrorist activity.” The White House on Friday dismissed it as politically motivated and poorly researched.

The compilation and disclosure of an intelligence report so directly at odds with top White House priorities marks an unusually sharp rupture between the administration and career public servants. It also underscores the difficulty President Donald Trump has had in converting his confrontational and bombastic campaign rhetoric into public policy.

“The president asked for an intelligence assessment. This is not the intelligence assessment the president asked for,” a senior administration official said.

(Shane Harris, emphasis added)

3

[Tucker] Carlson recounts, with some amusement, … receiving a text message on election night from a stunned Democratic friend declaring his intention to flee the country with his family. Carlson replied by asking if he could use their pool while they were gone.

(Terry Mattingly) I just realized that I thought this was funny mostly because of a residual GOP tribalism, utterly unrelated to any pleasure at The Mad Twitter King actually having been elected.

My bad. I guess this is something like getting Shingles at my age if you had Chicken Pox as a kid.

4

The Trump obsession with fake news still strikes me as a tactical diversion, perhaps even a nefarious tactical diversion, but:

Pretty sure he was referring to stories like this, which opens:

Sen. Marco Rubio won’t participate in town hall meetings because he says political activists will crash them to create a media spectacle of people who “heckle and scream at me in front of cameras.”

Apparently, that grossly mis-reports what Rubio said, though I can’t get the video to play.

* * * * *

“The truth is that the thing most present to the mind of man is not the economic machinery necessary to his existence; but rather that existence itself; the world which he sees when he wakes every morning and the nature of his general position in it. There is something that is nearer to him than livelihood, and that is life.” (G.K. Chesterton)

Some succinct standing advice on recurring themes.